Friday, January 21, 2011

social skills lacking?

i am wondering some days if my public school going kids' moms aren't right....i'm crazy for doing this. it's called homeschool. i wouldn't trade the experiences we have with it for anything. the time i get to spend with josey is priceless, and i will treasure it for the rest of my life...perhaps into eternity. it's days like today that are especially nice. with the temps in the sub-zero range, we don't have to leave the house if we don't want to. no bundling up. no scraping snow & ice. no shoveling. no tromping in snow boots to the bus. no driving to school to drop off or pick up. pj's all day if we want. we're still partially in pj's (and sweats) as of writing this. but we aren't lazy when it comes to school. josey's been working on math, grammar and spelling off and on since 11 this morning. that's another thing i love about homeschool....we can start and stop at any time during the day.


some may be asking the question, "what made you decide to homeschool?" one word: God. He put it on my heart shortly after being saved, and wouldn't relent until i finally saw that it was inevitable. God was going to get His way in this. i saw it then, and i'm so thankful of it now. i was working full-time, so i was curious how He was going to make it work. He allowed me to go part-time, even tho that wasn't exactly His plan. i was the one who asked for that path. He must have wanted to show me that His way is the best. it didn't take me long to see it, and soon i was without a job....period! however now i am doing childcare part-time.
the next question is this: "how do you get started?" for that answer i have found a website with a ton of helpful information. it is thehomeschoolmagazine.com, and of course there are a ton of other good internet resources out there. here is an article that is included on their site on how to get started....

How to Begin Homeschooling


1. Discuss with Your Spouse:  Educating your child at home is a huge decision and should b eone that is made with your spouse. Do not begin unless you are in agreement about this decision. You will need the support of your spouse not only at the beginngin, but also throughout the year.


2. Research the Homeschool Laws Applicable in Your Area:  Be fully aware of the legal requirements before you begin and especially before you take a child out of public school. For the U.S., each state's legal requirements can be found on the homeschoolegal.com website. Internationally, refer to hslda.org.


3. Research Styles of Home Education:  There is no single right way to educate your child at home; however, there are many differing philosophies you may want to consider:
     *Charlotte Mason: Based on a method introduced by nineteenth-century educator Charlotte Mason, this approach includes nature studies/journaling, narration, and living books.
     *Classical: Based on Dorothy Sayers' The Lost Tools of Learning, in which child development is broken up into three "stages" of learning commonly called "the Trivium."
     *Delight Directed: This puts the learning in the hands of the child, based on his or her interests. Parents help facilitate this type of learning with appropriate instructional materials.
     *Eclectic: A mix of philosophies and curricula to accommodate each child's abilities and interests. Parents choose from any method or style only those components that fit their specific needs.
     *The Principle Approach: An approach based on the principles of our Founding Fathers and an emphasis on God's Word as the basis for every subject.
     *Traditional Textbook: Normally uses a full-range, packaged, textbook-type curriculum that also may include a scope and sequence, testing, and recordkeeping.
     *Unit Studies: All or most core subjects are covered while studying any one topic or unit of study, using a variety of resources and supplemental activities.
     *Unschooling: A relaxed setting where learning is directed by the child. Parts of this philosophy are based on research by John Taylor Gatto and John Holt.


4. Find Support:  After finding your style of choice (or a mix of more than one choice), you may want to choose a support group that reflects that specific style or just a general homeschool support group in your area.  Meeting with other home educators offers encouragement as well as knowledge and assistance with  your homeschool questions. Often, organized classes or activities for your children are offered through support groups as well. For information about homeschool support groups in your area, check these listings:


U.S.
www.thehomeschoolmagazine.com/homeschool_nations/state_listings.php
www.homeschoollegal.com
U.K.
www.home-service.org
www.heas.org.uk
New Zealand:
www.che.org.nz
http//hef.org.nz
www.ahe.org.nz
www.homeschoolers.wellington.net.nz
http//community.library.org.nz/cgi-bin/display.pl?id=296
Guam:
www.homeschoolblogger.com/guam
www.tumon.com/ghsa
Australia:
www.hea.asn.au/hea/
Canada:
www.shbe.info
www.machs.mb.ca
www.aheaonline.com
http//nshea.webcentre.ca
www.eho.org/support/canada.asp


5. Gather Resources:  Some families start with a complete curriculum package, while others start with a notebook and a library card. Choosing your resources depends on your style or method of education and your own interests. If you are financially burdened, there are free homeschool resources on the web, as well as discounted, used books in abundance.


YOU CAN DO THIS!  Parents around the world are taking back their God-given responsibility to educate their children, and you can too. 
Disclaimer: The above information is not intended as legal advice and should not be
construed as such. Please check the legal requirements in your area.


so, there you have it. i hope this helps some of you who have considered homeschooling. it has been the best decision we have made regarding josey's education. he has grown so much academically since we've had him home, i am amazed at his progress. oh, and for those of you who may be concerned with his social skills, i have this to say to you......


bah-humbug!



i am not at all concerned about josey's social skills. he has more than enough friends his own age that keep him more than busy on days that he finds he has nothing to do. he also has friends younger than him, as well as older. he is comfortable conversing with adults, and is great with toddlers and babies. in fact, he'll be helping out in the 2-yr old nursery in march at our church. he participates in OnMission and Go110 on wednesday nights, has baseball in the summer, was in 2 plays this fall/winter, plus other homeschool activities throughout the school year....like working at pizza ranch to help pay for a trip to the cities; visiting radio stations, zoos, museums, planetariums, nursing homes, etc; not to mention the cities trip to see the science museum, state capital, and st paul cathedral. oh, the life of a homeschool family is definitely not boring and it's definitely a non-stop lesson in social skills.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Friday, January 21, 2011

social skills lacking?

i am wondering some days if my public school going kids' moms aren't right....i'm crazy for doing this. it's called homeschool. i wouldn't trade the experiences we have with it for anything. the time i get to spend with josey is priceless, and i will treasure it for the rest of my life...perhaps into eternity. it's days like today that are especially nice. with the temps in the sub-zero range, we don't have to leave the house if we don't want to. no bundling up. no scraping snow & ice. no shoveling. no tromping in snow boots to the bus. no driving to school to drop off or pick up. pj's all day if we want. we're still partially in pj's (and sweats) as of writing this. but we aren't lazy when it comes to school. josey's been working on math, grammar and spelling off and on since 11 this morning. that's another thing i love about homeschool....we can start and stop at any time during the day.


some may be asking the question, "what made you decide to homeschool?" one word: God. He put it on my heart shortly after being saved, and wouldn't relent until i finally saw that it was inevitable. God was going to get His way in this. i saw it then, and i'm so thankful of it now. i was working full-time, so i was curious how He was going to make it work. He allowed me to go part-time, even tho that wasn't exactly His plan. i was the one who asked for that path. He must have wanted to show me that His way is the best. it didn't take me long to see it, and soon i was without a job....period! however now i am doing childcare part-time.
the next question is this: "how do you get started?" for that answer i have found a website with a ton of helpful information. it is thehomeschoolmagazine.com, and of course there are a ton of other good internet resources out there. here is an article that is included on their site on how to get started....

How to Begin Homeschooling


1. Discuss with Your Spouse:  Educating your child at home is a huge decision and should b eone that is made with your spouse. Do not begin unless you are in agreement about this decision. You will need the support of your spouse not only at the beginngin, but also throughout the year.


2. Research the Homeschool Laws Applicable in Your Area:  Be fully aware of the legal requirements before you begin and especially before you take a child out of public school. For the U.S., each state's legal requirements can be found on the homeschoolegal.com website. Internationally, refer to hslda.org.


3. Research Styles of Home Education:  There is no single right way to educate your child at home; however, there are many differing philosophies you may want to consider:
     *Charlotte Mason: Based on a method introduced by nineteenth-century educator Charlotte Mason, this approach includes nature studies/journaling, narration, and living books.
     *Classical: Based on Dorothy Sayers' The Lost Tools of Learning, in which child development is broken up into three "stages" of learning commonly called "the Trivium."
     *Delight Directed: This puts the learning in the hands of the child, based on his or her interests. Parents help facilitate this type of learning with appropriate instructional materials.
     *Eclectic: A mix of philosophies and curricula to accommodate each child's abilities and interests. Parents choose from any method or style only those components that fit their specific needs.
     *The Principle Approach: An approach based on the principles of our Founding Fathers and an emphasis on God's Word as the basis for every subject.
     *Traditional Textbook: Normally uses a full-range, packaged, textbook-type curriculum that also may include a scope and sequence, testing, and recordkeeping.
     *Unit Studies: All or most core subjects are covered while studying any one topic or unit of study, using a variety of resources and supplemental activities.
     *Unschooling: A relaxed setting where learning is directed by the child. Parts of this philosophy are based on research by John Taylor Gatto and John Holt.


4. Find Support:  After finding your style of choice (or a mix of more than one choice), you may want to choose a support group that reflects that specific style or just a general homeschool support group in your area.  Meeting with other home educators offers encouragement as well as knowledge and assistance with  your homeschool questions. Often, organized classes or activities for your children are offered through support groups as well. For information about homeschool support groups in your area, check these listings:


U.S.
www.thehomeschoolmagazine.com/homeschool_nations/state_listings.php
www.homeschoollegal.com
U.K.
www.home-service.org
www.heas.org.uk
New Zealand:
www.che.org.nz
http//hef.org.nz
www.ahe.org.nz
www.homeschoolers.wellington.net.nz
http//community.library.org.nz/cgi-bin/display.pl?id=296
Guam:
www.homeschoolblogger.com/guam
www.tumon.com/ghsa
Australia:
www.hea.asn.au/hea/
Canada:
www.shbe.info
www.machs.mb.ca
www.aheaonline.com
http//nshea.webcentre.ca
www.eho.org/support/canada.asp


5. Gather Resources:  Some families start with a complete curriculum package, while others start with a notebook and a library card. Choosing your resources depends on your style or method of education and your own interests. If you are financially burdened, there are free homeschool resources on the web, as well as discounted, used books in abundance.


YOU CAN DO THIS!  Parents around the world are taking back their God-given responsibility to educate their children, and you can too. 
Disclaimer: The above information is not intended as legal advice and should not be
construed as such. Please check the legal requirements in your area.


so, there you have it. i hope this helps some of you who have considered homeschooling. it has been the best decision we have made regarding josey's education. he has grown so much academically since we've had him home, i am amazed at his progress. oh, and for those of you who may be concerned with his social skills, i have this to say to you......


bah-humbug!



i am not at all concerned about josey's social skills. he has more than enough friends his own age that keep him more than busy on days that he finds he has nothing to do. he also has friends younger than him, as well as older. he is comfortable conversing with adults, and is great with toddlers and babies. in fact, he'll be helping out in the 2-yr old nursery in march at our church. he participates in OnMission and Go110 on wednesday nights, has baseball in the summer, was in 2 plays this fall/winter, plus other homeschool activities throughout the school year....like working at pizza ranch to help pay for a trip to the cities; visiting radio stations, zoos, museums, planetariums, nursing homes, etc; not to mention the cities trip to see the science museum, state capital, and st paul cathedral. oh, the life of a homeschool family is definitely not boring and it's definitely a non-stop lesson in social skills.

No comments:

Post a Comment